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Trained in Austria

snow 35 °F

snow! Vienna

snow! Vienna


Vienna was indeed beautiful. We walked to the Danube our last evening there. Years ago I remember late night drinking of vodka with some Soviet guy, who insisted to us, "my blood is like the Danube, running through my veins!" That was my only connection to the Danube until we got to Vienna. So glad to have another visual to associate with that river! 

Vienna

Vienna


snow! Vienna

snow! Vienna


Today I really put the kids to the test as far as travel. This will be our only raeally brutal day of going from A to B. We have a 10 hour journey, including two different trains and one bus, to get from Vienna to Florence. We will will be only a few miles from Slovenia at one transfer point. Slovakia, Hungary and Croatia are all quite close as well. On the first train, the mountains, very snowy, are getting bigger and steeper, making the little towns look even more sweet.the quaintness of the towns is juxtaposed with a lot of mining activity. A lot.

Even though we face a long travel day, due to the fact that the overnight sleeper train for this route was sold out, we do get to see these amazing views! I don't know which mountains these are, but they are nice!
Vienna to Florence train/bus

Vienna to Florence train/bus


Vienna to Florence train/bus</p><p>The kids are doing school work. Coco learning her poetry terminology, reading some in a kids poetry anthology I put on her Kindle, and making her way through math worksheets. Henry is doing some language arts (identifying the main idea), journal writing and lots of math worksheets. They both are still memorizing their multiplication facts. And, I made up a special worksheet for each on simple words I'm frankly tired of them misspelling! </p><p>I hope to nap some time today. I was up a lot last night, watching CNN about Hurricane Sandy. Don is home solo for this storm, which sound like the worst one to hit Mount Rainier since Irene in 2003. He's prone to late-night from-the-porch-roof tree trimming and other unsafe activities. Be safe, honey! Everyone here knows about Sandy, even on the front page of the papers.</p><p>We are on the bus part of our journey. A double decker Mercedez Benz coach with first class section on the lower level. Nicer than the Austrian train just about. I am on thaisle in front of the kids,mouth the window seat next to me open. The British guy in front of me but on the window seat has reclined back as far as humanly possible and is sorting through 10 cassette tapes to play in his Sony Walkman, which looks just like the one my dad gave me in 1982 or 83 for getting into the National Honor Society (little did they know...). What a piece of time capsule this guy is! He has a pair of seats facing him and, of course!, his stocking feet are on them. </p><p>Why pay attention to that bloke when I have plenty of room and thai scenery is SPECTACULAR?! We are still going through mountains all these hours later. Given the cushy comfort of the bus, the amazing scenery, and fully charged electronic toys, we are happy not to be on the night train. Tunnels, bridges, valley town, river, mining somethingorother, crazy snow topped mountains, repeat.</p><p>I will say that some of these little towns, nestled deep in the sharp crevices of the valleys, look like they are way too close to mining and mining roads. </p><p>We must be in Italy now as I can make out what the highway signs might be saying. For the last few weeks, it's been a real comical crap shoot! I don't speak Italian but I can at least fake it. I think! </p><p>I want to make a quick side note on beggars. We saw a few, not many, in Prague and Vienna and they had the same M.O. Of kneeling with arms outstretched, hands cupped. I mention it because I keep thinking of them. Part of me wanted to liberate them, tell them they could stand up and still ask for money! Part of me wondered why they knelt like that, if it was some biblical pose. Oat every beggar we saw in Paris, and there were a lot of them, seemed to have a pet, usually a little dog. Henry and Coco decided that having a pet in France must cost next to no money since even the poorest people seemed to have them.</p></div>
      
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Posted by Lindacdc 08:57 Archived in Austria

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